Fender Telecaster ‘50s MIJ (early ‘90s) Sold!

Click to enlarge

Image Gallery

The ‘50s Tele was marketed as a general tribute to the guitars of the mid-20th century, rather than a reissue of a specific year’s guitar. This stellar example has a comfortable “c” neck (yeah, we know — some players swear by ‘em and those who don’t swear at them; but we’re generally in the former camp). The frets are diminutive, but with the gargantuan wires (including a wound “g”) that everybody used back in the day, we’re not even sure you could physically bend the strings like we do today—hence the smaller fret wire. However, it should be noted that the frets are in great shape, with years of life remaining. The Japanese Fenders from this era have swiftly gained a reputation as fine instruments with great finish and fit work. This one also sounds really good— the pickups are voiced to provide sparkle without spike (it reminded us a bit of Jim Weider's very appealing tone, which melds potent bass with impossibly lustrous highs). The vanilla custard finish is a little more opaque than some of the examples we have seen, but in an attractive way. It has one significant dent on the back that reveals the tight, even grain of the wood, which leads up to believe the body is made from Sen, or Japanese ash. With one dent in the back (see photo) and the expected edgewear, else 8/10. (Sorry, the rare Jax pedal and Fender VibroChamp amp are not included.) With Fender gigbag. SOLD.

Product not in stock

Price: $0.00

Shipping:$0.00

This product has sold out.

LoadingUpdating...

The ‘50s Tele was marketed as a general tribute to the guitars of the mid-20th century, rather than a reissue of a specific year’s guitar. This stellar example has a comfortable “c” neck (yeah, we know — some players swear by ‘em and those who don’t swear at them; but we’re generally in the former camp). The frets are diminutive, but with the gargantuan wires (including a wound “g”) that everybody used back in the day, we’re not even sure you could physically bend the strings like we do today—hence the smaller fret wire. However, it should be noted that the frets are in great shape, with years of life remaining. The Japanese Fenders from this era have swiftly gained a reputation as fine instruments with great finish and fit work. This one also sounds really good— the pickups are voiced to provide sparkle without spike (it reminded us a bit of Jim Weider’s very appealing tone, which melds potent bass with impossibly lustrous highs). The vanilla custard finish is a little more opaque than some of the examples we have seen, but in an attractive way. It has one significant dent on the back that reveals the tight, even grain of the wood, which leads up to believe the body is made from Sen, or Japanese ash. With one dent in the back (see photo) and the expected edgewear, else 8/10. (Sorry, the rare Jax pedal and Fender VibroChamp amp are not included.) With Fender gigbag. SOLD.