Fender Telecaster (1971) SOLD!

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Credit Terry Kath. The late guitarist for the band Chicago, who was known for his soulful vocals and fiery lead guitar (check out this live clip of the gritty “Uptown” as an example) is credited as one of the first to install a humbucker in the neck position of his ‘70s Tele in order to attain both Gibson and Fender tones in a single guitar. We’ve since seen a number of old Teles with similar mods, but none of them are better than this 1971 example. The guitar has been played all right, and has the requisite wear to show for it, including some buckle rash on the back and a few dings scattered on top. But it’s also lightweight, has an inviting “C”-shaped neck and there is even some fret life left (though the wire on ‘70s Fenders was pretty small to begin with, so if you prefer modern jumbo frets, you might think it’s time for a refret). All the pots are original CTS, the lead pickup is original and still vibrant and both the neck plate and date stamp on the neck butt identify this as a ’71 model. Other than the original neck pickup, which has been replaced with a vibey vintage DeArmond humbucker, and the string ferrules, the guitar appears to be all original. Comes nestled in a vintage non-original hardshell case. A hyperbolically cool and versatile guitar. 7.5/10.

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Credit Terry Kath. The late guitarist for the band Chicago, who was known for his soulful vocals and fiery lead guitar (check out this live clip of the gritty “Uptown” as an example) is credited as one of the first to install a humbucker in the neck position of his ‘70s Tele in order to attain both Gibson and Fender tones in a single guitar. We’ve since seen a number of old Teles with similar mods, but none of them are better than this 1971 example. The guitar has been played all right, and has the requisite wear to show for it, including some buckle rash on the back and a few dings scattered on top. But it’s also lightweight, has an inviting “C”-shaped neck and there is even some fret life left (though the wire on ‘70s Fenders was pretty small to begin with, so if you prefer modern jumbo frets, you might think it’s time for a refret). All the pots are original CTS, the lead pickup is original and still vibrant and both the neck plate and date stamp on the neck butt identify this as a ’71 model. Other than the original neck pickup, which has been replaced with a vibey vintage DeArmond humbucker, and the string ferrules, the guitar appears to be all original. Comes nestled in a vintage non-original hardshell case. A hyperbolically cool and versatile guitar. 7.5/10.