Guild F-30 (1969) SOLD!

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The smallest of Guild’s original flat tops, the F-30 was introduced in 1954 and proved particularly popular during the “Great Folk Scare” of the ‘60s, with troubadours like Paul Simon regularly seen wielding this ergonomic and great-sounding model on-stage. This Westerly, R.I.-made beauty is finished in an attractive, understated sunburst and is in very good condition with only a minor (and stable) seam separation and a few typical dings and minor scratches on the back. After oiling the fingerboard and polishing the frets, we deemed the guitar ready for action. If your repertoire requires the ability to seamlessly transition between strumming and playing fingerstyle, this would be an ideal choice; it’s more delicately voiced than a typical dreadnought, but has enough low mids and bass to work well in either a group or solo context. The only notable quirk is the fact that the original soundhole label is affixed upside down. Although we suppose it is possible it came that way from the factory, it seems more likely that the original owner reaffixed the errant label at some point, without noticing that it had gone in upside down. In any event, the label placement in no way impairs the great tone or easy playability. Comes with a period-correct hardshell case. 8/10. SOLD!

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The smallest of Guild’s original flat tops, the F-30 was introduced in 1954 and proved particularly popular during the “Great Folk Scare” of the ‘60s, with troubadours like Paul Simon regularly seen wielding this ergonomic and great-sounding model on-stage. This Westerly, R.I.-made beauty is finished in an attractive, understated sunburst and is in very good condition with only a minor (and stable) seam separation and a few typical dings and minor scratches on the back. After oiling the fingerboard and polishing the frets, we deemed the guitar ready for action. If your repertoire requires the ability to seamlessly transition between strumming and playing fingerstyle, this would be an ideal choice; it’s more delicately voiced than a typical dreadnought, but has enough low mids and bass to work well in either a group or solo context. The only notable quirk is the fact that the original soundhole label is affixed upside down. Although we suppose it is possible it came that way from the factory, it seems more likely that the original owner reaffixed the errant label at some point, without noticing that it had gone in upside down. In any event, the label placement in no way impairs the great tone or easy playability. Comes with a period-correct hardshell case. 8/10. SOLD!