Fender Jazzmaster (1965) SOLD!

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Introduced in 1958 as Fender’s attempt to seize some of the upscale jazz market (hence the name), the Jazzmaster was soundly ignored by jazz players more accustomed to Gibson’s blingy archtops. Instead, the guitar briefly established a foothold with surf bands, then faded into years of obscurity before elbowing its way back into the spotlight in the hands of Lee Ranaldo of Sonic Youth and Wilco’s Nels Cline, among others. This 1965 example is in very good-plus condition. One small dent under the low E string at the 8th fret (see photo), a few exceedingly minor dings in the body, and some very faint evidence of what appears to have been an old Fender back protector on the edges. Very little fretwear, a gorgeous, unusually figured Brazilian rosewood fingerboard, comfortable c-shaped neck profile as typically found on 1964 and ’65 Fenders. And the tone? Since you asked, we’ll just say that the voice produced by the wide-signal pickups is a little rounder and more robust (dare we say “jazz-like”?) than that of the Stratocaster. The tone circuit allows the player to preset different tone and volume settings and to move between the two with the simple flip of a switch. In sum, a great-sounding, all-original instrument. Comes with original black “no logo” case, which is also in very good condition.

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Introduced in 1958 as Fender’s attempt to seize some of the upscale jazz market (hence the name), the Jazzmaster was soundly ignored by jazz players more accustomed to Gibson’s blingy archtops. Instead, the guitar briefly established a foothold with surf bands, then faded into years of obscurity before elbowing its way back into the spotlight in the hands of Lee Ranaldo of Sonic Youth and Wilco’s Nels Cline, among others. This 1965 example is in very good-plus condition. One small dent under the low E string at the 8th fret (see photo), a few exceedingly minor dings in the body, and some very faint evidence of what appears to have been an old Fender back protector on the edges. Very little fretwear, a gorgeous, unusually figured Brazilian rosewood fingerboard, comfortable c-shaped neck profile as typically found on 1964 and ’65 Fenders. And the tone? Since you asked, we’ll just say that the voice produced by the wide-signal pickups is a little rounder and more robust (dare we say “jazz-like”?) than that of the Stratocaster. The tone circuit allows the player to preset different tone and volume settings and to move between the two with the simple flip of a switch. In sum, a great-sounding, all-original instrument. Comes with original black “no logo” case, which is also in very good condition.