Fender Princeton (1964) SOLD!

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For many of us, there’s nothing quite as magical as a pair of 6V6s through a good ten-inch speaker. So let’s clear the air about an often misunderstood Fender model that happens to be one of our favorites. First, the only difference between a brown Princeton and a black-with-white-barrel-knobs Princeton is the color—they both use the exact same 6G2 circuit. Second, the circuitry and sound of this model is nothing like the later AA964 blackface Princeton. The 6G2 circuitry used in this amp is a virtual match to that of the tweed Vibrolux, giving this amp more midrange and grind than the later blackface amps that wore the Princeton name. Throw in the deep tremolo that comes from modulating the output tube bias, and you have a pretty potent combination. This type of tremolo sounds distinctly different from the optical bias Fender moved to later in 1964. To our ears, it gives a swampier, more organic feel. This particular example is in amazingly clean condition and is all-original with the exception of the speaker, which we have upgraded to a 1965 Jensen model C10P from our private stash. While we feel this to be a significant sonic upgrade, we will happily substitute the original CTS square-magnet speaker—but be aware that it needs a recone. SOLD! Thanks Steve!

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For many of us, there’s nothing quite as magical as a pair of 6V6s through a good ten-inch speaker. So let’s clear the air about an often misunderstood Fender model that happens to be one of our favorites. First, the only difference between a brown Princeton and a black-with-white-barrel-knobs Princeton is the color—they both use the exact same 6G2 circuit. Second, the circuitry and sound of this model is nothing like the later AA964 blackface Princeton. The 6G2 circuitry used in this amp is a virtual match to that of the tweed Vibrolux, giving this amp more midrange and grind than the later blackface amps that wore the Princeton name. Throw in the deep tremolo that comes from modulating the output tube bias, and you have a pretty potent combination. This type of tremolo sounds distinctly different from the optical bias Fender moved to later in 1964. To our ears, it gives a swampier, more organic feel. This particular example is in amazingly clean condition and is all-original with the exception of the speaker, which we have upgraded to a 1965 Jensen model C10P from our private stash. While we feel this to be a significant sonic upgrade, we will happily substitute the original CTS square-magnet speaker—but be aware that it needs a recone. SOLD! Thanks Steve!