Fender Pro Amplifier (1963) SOLD!

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What is it with brown Fender amps? Does the color of the tolex really describe the tone? As thick as a chocolate milkshake? As greasy as a bowl of beef gravy? As intoxicating as dark ale? Well, you get the picture. When this handsome devil arrived, it sounded good. But it did not sound great—it was slightly thin, cold, and underpowered. Knowing that these amps aren’t built to be 90-pound weaklings, we pulled out the tube tester and a Fluke meter. When the tubes (which appear to be original to the amp) tested fine, we knew that the culprit was probably the bias setting. Over the years, we’ve found that many brown Fenders were biased quite cold from the factory. We hooked the meter. Bingo. Each 5881 output tube was drawing a mere 17mA of current. We ratcheted things up to a much warmer 37mA per tube and plugged in a Tele. The sound that greeted our ears made us feel like we were living the scene in Young Frankenstein where Gene Wilder looks up to heaven and yells at top of his lungs, “It’s alive! It’s alive! It’s alive!” The transformation was amazing. Suddenly, this became one of those rare amps that could do no wrong. It felt like it was hardwired to the nerves in our picking hands. And we have to give you fair warning: If you’re a male guitar player over 40 and you don’t exercise your upper body, you might want to reach for your “bro” before engaging the harmonic vibrato. Its deep, 3-D throb has the potential of inducing some serious jiggle. And what a highly addictive effect it is—it’s great for everything from spooky-sounding swamp riffs to cool-as-hell spaghetti western breaks. The big and big-sounding 15” Utah speaker not only sounds great for western swing, jump blues, and roots rock, but it also provides a surprisingly Marshall-like wail when cranked. All original. SOLD!

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What is it with brown Fender amps? Does the color of the tolex really describe the tone? As thick as a chocolate milkshake? As greasy as a bowl of beef gravy? As intoxicating as dark ale? Well, you get the picture. When this handsome devil arrived, it sounded good. But it did not sound great—it was slightly thin, cold, and underpowered. Knowing that these amps aren’t built to be 90-pound weaklings, we pulled out the tube tester and a Fluke meter. When the tubes (which appear to be original to the amp) tested fine, we knew that the culprit was probably the bias setting. Over the years, we’ve found that many brown Fenders were biased quite cold from the factory. We hooked the meter. Bingo. Each 5881 output tube was drawing a mere 17mA of current. We ratcheted things up to a much warmer 37mA per tube and plugged in a Tele. The sound that greeted our ears made us feel like we were living the scene in Young Frankenstein where Gene Wilder looks up to heaven and yells at top of his lungs, “It’s alive! It’s alive! It’s alive!” The transformation was amazing. Suddenly, this became one of those rare amps that could do no wrong. It felt like it was hardwired to the nerves in our picking hands. And we have to give you fair warning: If you’re a male guitar player over 40 and you don’t exercise your upper body, you might want to reach for your “bro” before engaging the harmonic vibrato. Its deep, 3-D throb has the potential of inducing some serious jiggle. And what a highly addictive effect it is—it’s great for everything from spooky-sounding swamp riffs to cool-as-hell spaghetti western breaks. The big and big-sounding 15” Utah speaker not only sounds great for western swing, jump blues, and roots rock, but it also provides a surprisingly Marshall-like wail when cranked. All original. SOLD!